We are an interdisciplinary group of faculty with research interests that vary from studies of global ecological change, organismal interactions in infectious disease, and stream ecology to muscle protein structure, chromosome function, molecular evolution, and plant biotechnology. Biology is the unifying discipline in life science because it investigates all living things — from bacteria and viruses, to plants, animals, and humans and their relationship to their environments. Majors in our department study the structure and function of cells, organ systems and tissues in animals and plants; ecology; and evolution. Our curriculum provides a solid and broad foundation of knowledge while offering an opportunity to choose an area of emphasis within life sciences that is related to individual career goals.

The Biology Department was ranked second in the nation in 2006 of programs that offer Zoology degrees. Because of their remarkable research accomplishments, several faculty have received Career Awards and Presidential Young Investigator Awards from the National Science Foundation. Research results from the Biology faculty are defining new principles in many areas of investigation. The exceptional impact of their work is documented by the more than 3,000 citations of faculty research papers in 2006. Not surprisingly, the department’s research is well supported by federal and state grants, and many undergraduates gain valuable research experiences in the laboratory or field.

Biology faculty are also dedicated to the University’s teaching mission. Student surveys routinely rank Biology classes among the best at CSU and departmental faculty regularly win college and university teaching awards.

If you’re looking for an outstanding education and research experience, we encourage you to seriously consider the Department of Biology at Colorado State University.

News

Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads

A CSU team conducted a survey-based study among physical and life science undergraduate courses, asking students how they perceived each other’s abilities.

Study: Planting new forests is part of but not the whole solution to climate change

A CSU biology researcher finds that the carbon-capture potential of afforestation may be overestimated.

Biology department welcomes Professor Debbie Garrity as new chair

Professor Debbie Garrity will become chair of the Biology Department in July.

How teachers are adapting to COVID-19 disruptions is subject of new CSU study

Researchers will survey Noyce scholars, just entering the teaching profession, on how they’ve responded to the pandemic.

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